Sunday, February 7, 2016

Political correctness run amok

 "I really don't understand the world anymore."  --Jason Gideon in his letter to Spencer Reid on why he's leaving the BAU

I recently came across a list of words which a University of Missouri group says journalists should not use, for fear of offending somebody. This list came out in 1990, so it is not some recent thing. Here are a few of the words which supposedly should not be used.

ugh  --  said to be "highly offensive" because it mimics American Indian speech
Dutch treat  --  implies that Dutch people are cheap
burly  --  too often associated with large black men, and implying ignorance
fried chicken  --  again, a stereotype of black people
jock  --  can be offensive to some
rubbing noses  --  objectionable to Eskimos
many words used to describe females  --  airhead, buxom, dingbat, dizzy, gorgeous, pert, petite, stunning, sweetie




PCC December Swiss

Round 1, chessart(1827)-Richardson(1333/P5)
1 d4 d5 2 c4 c6 3 cd cd 4 Nc3 Nf6 5 Nf3 e6 6 Bf4 Bc6 7 e3 Ne4

     Only the 9th-most popular move in the database.

8 a3

     A database game continued 8. Bd3 f5 9. O-O Be7 10. Ne5 O-O 11. f3 Nd6 12. a3 Bf6 13. Qe1 Bxe5 14. dxe5 Nf7 15. Qg3 d4 16. Nb5 dxe3 17. Nd6 Nxd6 18. exd6 Qf6 19. Rad1 Qxb2 20. Bxe3 Bd7 21. Rfe1 Qf6 22. Bg5 Qg6 23. Qh4 h6 24. Bc1 Nd8 25. Bc4 Re8 26. Re3 Nf7 27. f4 Rad8 28. Rg3 Qh7 29. Bb2 g5 30. fxg5 hxg5 31. Rxg5+ Nxg5 32. Qxg5+ Kf7 33. Qf6+ Kg8 34. Rd3 f4 35. Qg5+ Kf7 36. Qf6+ Kg8 37. Qxf4 1-0

 8...Bd6 9 BxB QxB 10 Rc1 a6 11 Bd3 f5 12 0-0 0-0 13 f3 Nxc3 15 Rxc3 e5 16 de Qxe5 17 Bb1 d4 18 ed Qxd4+ 19 Kh8 Rae8 20 Nb3 QxQ+ 21 RxQ Re7 22 Rc2 Rfe8 23 RxR RxR 24 Nc5 Bc8 25 b4 g6 26 Kg1 Re3 27 Nd3 Kg7 28 Kf2 Re7 29 Nf4 Rd7 30 Ne6+ Kf6 31 RxR BxR 32 Nc5 Bc8 33 Ke3 b6 34 Na4 b5 35 Nc5 Ne5 36 Ba2 g5 37 f4?? Ng4+ 38 Kf3 Nxh2+ 39 Kg3 Nf8+ 40 Kf2 Nd2 41 fg+ Kxg5 42 Be6 BxB 43 NxB+ Kg4 44 Nc7 Nc4 45 NxP  NxP 48 Nd4 h5 49 Nf3 h4 50 Ne5+ Kf4 51 Ng6+ Kg5 52 Ne5 draw agreed 1/2-1/2

Round 2, Leung(1218)-chessart(1827)
1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cd 4 Nxd4 Nf6 5 Nc3 g6 6 Be2 Bg7 7 Be3 0-0 8 0-0 a6 9 a4 Bd7 10 f3 Nc6 11 Qd2 Rc8 12 Nb3 Ne5 13 Bh6 BxB


       I have resolved to always take this bishop, after the debacle last week.

14 QxB Be6 15 Nd2Qb6+ 16 Kh1 Qxb2 17 Rab1?

       Losing the P/b2 is one thing, but this drops a whole piece.


17...Qxc3 18 Rxb7 Qxc2 19 Rxe7 Qxa4 20 h3 Rc2 21 Rb1 Rfc8 22 R1b7 Rc1+ 23 kH2 qA1 24 bF1 RxB 25 RxR QxN 26 RxB Nxf3+! 27 PxN

       27 Kg3 Nh5+ 28 Kg4 Nh2+ 29 Kg5 Qf4#

27...Rc2+ 28 Kg3 Qf2+ 29 Kf4 Qd2+ 30 Kg3 QxQ 31 Rbe7 Qg5#

Round 3, chessart(1827)-Ethan Wu(1804)

1 d4 d5 2 c4 c6 3 cd cd 4 Bf4 Nf6 5 e3 Nc6 6 Nc3 Bf5

     My first-round opponent shut in his Queen Bishop with ...e6. White retains a 10% advantage against both approaches. 

7 Nf3 e6 8 Bb5 Bd6 9 BxB QxB 10 0-0 0-0 11 Rc1 Ne4 12 NxN BxN 13 BxN bc 14 Nd2 Bg6 15 Nb3 e5 16 Qd2 Rfc8 17 Rc5 ed 18 ed Bf5 19 Rfc1 Qg6 20 Qf4 Bd3 21 a4 Bf5 22 Na5 Bd7 23 Qe3 Rc7 24 Qc3 Rc8 25 Kf1 Qe4 26 Re1 Qg6 27 RxR+ BxR 28 Qc2 Qf6 29 Qc3 Qe6 30 b4 Re7 31 Qd2 Bd7 32 Rc1 Qd6 33 Kg1 h6 34 Nb7 Qg6 35 Nc5 Bg4 36 Re1 Qc2! 37 Qc1 Re2! 38 Rf1  1/2-1/2

     I was down to two minutes here and stopped keeping score. We drew after many more moves.


Round 4, Berger(1532)-chessart(1827)
1 d4 Nf6 2 Nf3 c5 3 e3 d5 4 Nc3?

     White should play 4 c4, after which I would have traded pawns on d4, transposing into the Panov-Botvinnik variation of the Caro-Kann.

4...e6 5 Bb5+ Bd7 6 0-0 BxB 7 NxB a6 8 Nc3 Nc6 9 a3 Rc8 10 PxP BxP 11 Nd4 NxN 12 PxN Be7 13 Re1 0-0 14 Re3?

     It is hard to see the point of this move. Brian has a habit of developing his major pieces prematurely. For example, in a prior game with him he moved his queen 17 times in his first 34 moves!

 Qc7 15 Qf3 Qb6 16 Rd3 Rc6 17 h3 R8c8 18 Qe2 Qc7 19 Qf3 Ne4 20 Bf4

     My idea here was that 20 NxN PxN 21 Qxe4 Rxc2 is good for black.

20...Bd6 21 BxB QxB 22 g3 NxN 23 RxN RxR 24 bc Qc7 25 Rb1 b5

     I saw no reason to allow him the counterplay to be had with 25...Qxc3 26 QxQ RxQ 27 Rxb2.


26 Rb3 h6 27 h4 Qc4 28 g4 a5 29 g5 hg 30 hg a4 31 Rb4 Qxc3 32 Qe2 Qxc2 33 Qxb5 Qc1+ 34 Kg2

     34 Kh2 Qf4+ is equally bad.

34...Qxg5+ 35 Kh2 Qf4+ 36 Kg2 Rc2

     36...Qe4+ 37 Kh2 Rc1 and white is helpless against the threat of 38...Rh1+ 39 Kg3 Rg1+ followed by 40 Qh1#

37 Qf1 Rc3 38 Rxa4 Qg4+ 39 Kh2 Qh4+ 40 Kg1 Qg5+ 41 Kh2 Rc1 42 Ra8+ Kh7 43 Qd3+ g6 44 Qh3+ Qh5

     Black must be careful to avoid 44...Kg7?? 45 Qh8# and 44...Qh6? 45 Rh8+! and I lose queen for rook. Fortunately I had enough time left to think through the position and avoid these blunders.

45 QxQ PxQ 46 Kg3 Kg6 47 f3 Rc5 48 Rg8+ Kh7 49 Rg5 Kh6 50 Rg8 ??? 51 Rh8+ Kg6 52 Rg8+ Kf5 53 Rh8 h4+ 54 Kh3 Ra4 55 Rh5" Kg6 56 RxR RxR+

     I must have counted out the moves a dozen times to make sure my king can stop his a-pawn. It indeed does, as I get to b7 when his pawn would still be at a7. I forgot about the simple rule of thumb of moving into "the square of the pawn", which avoids all the tedious counting.

57 KxP Kf6  And white resigned some 20 moves later. 0-1



Friday, February 5, 2016

PCC January Swiss

Round 1, chessart-Hansen, Smith-Morra Gambit
1 e4 c5 2 d4 cd 3 c3 dc 4 Nxc3 e6 5 Bc4 Nc6 6 Nf3 Be7 7 Bf4 a6 8 Qe2 b5 9 Bb3 Bc5 10 0-0 Nd4 11 NxN BxN 12 Rc1 Bb7 13 Rfd1 e5 14 Be3 BxB 15 QxB Nf6 16 f3 0-0 17 Nd5 NxN 18 BxN BxB 19 RxB 20 R1d1 ( 20 Rc7!) Rfd8 21 Rd6 a5 22 Qb6 b4 23 Qb7 Rab8 24 Rxd7 RxQ 25 RxR+ Kf8 26 RxQ+ KxQ 27 Rd5 Rc7 28 Rxe5 Rc2 29 Rxa5 Rxb2 30 h3


     Better is 30 a3, liquidating the queenside pawns and leaving me with four pawns to three on the kingside in a rook and pawn endgame.

30...Ke7 31 Ra6 (31 a3 is still good) f6 32 Kh2 h5 33 h4 Kd7 34 Kg3 Kc7 35 Kh3 Kb7 36 Ra4 Kb6 37 g4 Kb5 38 Ra8 Ke4 39 g5 (39 gh!) Kd3 40 gf gf 41 Kg3 Kd3 42 Ra4 Rb1 43 Kg7 Rb2+ 1/2-1/2

Round 3, chessart-Niamdorj, Catalan
1 d4 e6 2 c4 Nf6 3 g3 Nc6

     Usual are 3...d5, 3...c5, or 3...Bb4+.

4 Bg2 Be7 5 Nf3 0-0 6 0-0 Rb8 7Nc3 d5 8 Ne5 Bd7 9 cd NxN 10 de Nxd5 11 NxN ed 12 Bxd5

     I have won a pawn, for the relatively small price of doubled e-pawns.

Bg4 13 Bf3 QxQ 14 RxQ BxB 15 ef

Now my doubled pawns are on the f-file, which is even better for me.

Rbd8 16 Be3 b6 17 Kf1 f5 18 f4 Kf7 19 Ke2 h5 20 h4 g6 21 RxR RxR 22 Rd1 Rc8 23 a4 Kd6 24 Rd3 c5 25 b3 a6 26 Kd2 c4 27 bc Rxc4 28 Rd4 Bb4+ 29 Ke2 Rc2+ 30 Kd3 Rc3+ 31 Ke2 Bc5 32 Rd3 Rc4 33 BxB bc 34 Rd6+ Kf7 35 Rxa6 Rc3 36 a5 Ra3 37 Rf6+ Kg7 38 a6 c4 39 Rc6 c3 40 Rc7+ Kf8 41 a7 1-0

     From here we somehow managed to trade off the queenside pawns, with my rook still imprisoning his king on the 8th rank, and my king then infiltrated into his kingside and captured his g and f pawns, at which point he resigned.

Round 4, chessart-Cigan, Gruenfeld Defense
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 d5 4 Bg5 Bg7 5 BxN BxB 6 Nxd5

     6 cxd5 is preferred by about 6-1. I should have given it more consideration.

Bg7 7 Nf3 c5 8 e3 Nc6 9 dc

     In light of what happens, 9 Qd2 or 9 Be2 would be better options here.

9...Bxb2 10 Rb1 Bg7 11 Qd2 0-0 12 Bd3 e6 13 Nc3 Qe7

     The game I had been studying, Sachdev-Kiran, continued 12...Rb8. Jason's line here is much better for black.

14 0-0?

     It looks like 14 Ne4 would provide better resistance to black's offensive against my c-pawns.

14...Qxc5 15 Rb5 Qe7 16 R1b1 Rd8 17 Qc2 b6

     This move is now possible with the P/c5 gone, and if black can play this move, then my plan of doubling rooks on the b-file is pointless.

18 Be4 Bd7 19 R5b3 Rac8 20 Nb5 Na5 21 Rb4 BxN 22 RxB Rxc4 23 Qe2 RxB 24 h3 Qd5 25 Kf1 Qd3 26 Rd1 RxP+ 27 Kf1 Rb1 0-1

Wednesday, December 23, 2015

PCC December Quads

Round 1, Raptis(2366)-chessart(1835), Benko Gambit, Zaitsev System
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 c5 3 d5 b5 4 cb a6 5 Nc3 ab 6 e4

     This initiates the Zaitsev System, a trappy line for white against the Benko, but good for black if black know what he's doing. Unfortunately, I did not remember the line well enough to go into it

6...d6?

     Correct is 6...b4. I was sure that my high-rated opponent would know the main line better than I did, as it had been many years since I studied it. I was unsure of 6...b4 7 e5, but after bc 8 ef Qa5! 9 bc Qxc3+ 10 Bd2 Qxf6 Black is clearly winning. The main line actually runs 7 Nb5 d6 8 Bf4 g5 9 Bxg5 Nxe4 10 Bf4 Qa5 11 Bc4 Bg7 12 Qe2 b3+ 13 Kf1 f5 14 f3 0-0 15 fe fe 16 g3 Qxa2 17 Rxa2 ba 18 Bxa2 Rxa2 19 Qxe4 Ba6 20 Nh3 Rxb2 21 Ke1 Bxb5 (Black has R + B for Q) 22 Kd1 Nd7 23 Ng5 Nf6 23 Ng5 Nf6 24 Qe6+ Kh8 25 Re1 Ba4+ 26 Kc1 Rc2+ 27 Kd1 Rxh2+ drawn.

     Nick said after the game that he plays 8 Bc4 (instead of 8 Bf4), and the main line after that runs 8...Nbd7 9 Nf3 Nb6 10 Bd3 g6 11 b3 Bg7 12 Bb2 0-0 13 0-0 Ba6 14 Qe2 Qd7 15 a2 bxa3 16 Rxa3 and black won both games from here.

     The question arises as to why black can't take the white P/e5 at move 8. It turns out it is playable, contrary to Nick's belief. One game ran Nxe4 9. Qe2 Nf6 10. Bf4 Ra6 11. Nxd6+ Rxd6 12. Bb5+ Bd7 13. Bxd6 Qb6 14. Bxd7+ Nbxd7 15. Bg3 Nxd5 16. Nf3 e6 17. O-O Be7 18. Rfd1 N7f6 19. Ne5 O-O 20. Qc4 Rc8 21. a4 Qa5 22. Qc2 Nb6 23. b3 Nfd5 24. Nc4 Nxc4 25. bxc4 Nc3 26. Re1 Bf6 27. Be5 Bxe5 28. Rxe5 Rd8 29. f4 g6 30. h4 Rd4 31. Qf2 Rxc4 32. h5 b3 33. h6 Qb6 34. a5 b2 35. Rb1 Qd8 36. Rxb2 Nd1 37. Rd2 Rd4 38. Rxd4 cxd4 39. Qf3 Nc3 40. Qd3 Nd5 41. a6 Nxf4 42. a7 Qa8 43. Qf3 Qxa7 44. Qxf4 1-0

     The other game ran 17. Ne5 Nxe5 18. Bxe5 f6 19. Bg3 Kf7 20. O-O h5 21. h4 g6 22. a4 Be7 23. a5 Qc6 24. Qc4 Ra8 25. Rfe1 Ra6 26. Re2 Qa8 27. Qb5 Qc8 28. Rc1 Qc6 29. Qc4 Qa8 30. Rce1 Rc6 31. Bf4 Qa6 32. Qe4 f5 33. Qf3 Nxf4 34. Qxf4 Qxa5 35. Qc4 Qa6 36. Qf4 Rd6 37. Qe5 Qc6 38. Qf4 Bf6 39. Qc4 Qd5 40. Rc1 Qxc4 41. Rxc4 Rd1+ 42. Kh2 Bd4 43. g3 e5 44. Kg2 Ke6 45. Rec2 Kd5 46. Kf3 b3 47. Rxd4+ Kxd4 48. Rc3 Rd3+ 0-1



7 Bxb5+ Bd7 8 Bc4 g6 9 Nf3 Bg7 10 e5 de? 11 Nxe5 0-0 12 0-0 Na6 13 Qe2 Nc7 14 Rd1 Qe8 15 Be3 Rc8 16 f4 e6 17 Bxc5 Nxd5 18 Bxf8 Nxc3 19 bc Qxf8 20 Nxd7 NxN 21 RxR Qc5+ 22 Kh1 QxB 23 Rd8+ 1-0
                                                ***                                               ***
Round 2, chessart(1835)-Taylor(1975), Albin Counter-Gambit
1 d4 d5 2 c4 e5

     This initiates the Albin Counter-Gambit.

3 de d4 4 Nf3 Nc6 5 g3 Nge7

     5...Bg4 6. Bg2 Qd7 7. O-O O-O-O 8. Nbd2 h5 9. h4 Nge7 10. b4 Ng6 11. b5 Ncxe5 12. Qa4 Kb8 13. Nb3 Nxf3 14. exf3 Bh3 15. Nxd4 Bxg2 16. Nc6 bxc6 17. bxc6 Qc8 18. Be3 a6  is the main line here, while Be6 6. Nbd2 Qd7 7. Bg2 O-O-O 8. O-O h5 9. h4 Nh6 10. b4 Ng4 11. Qa4 Kb8 is the secondary line, with white's move a close third.  White has a huge advantage in all three of these lines.

6 Bg2 Ng6 7 0-0 Ngxe5 8 NxN NxN 9 Nd2

     9 b3 is most common, with the idea of 9...Be7 10. Bb2 c5 11. e3 Nc6 12. Bxc6 bxc6 13. exd4 cxd4 14. Qxd4 Qxd4 15. Bxd4 O-O 16. Re1 Be6 17. Nc3 Rfd8 18. Be5  and both these games were drawn, which calls into question the wisdom of white's giving up his B/g2 to win black's d-pawn. If black plays 10...Bf6 (instead of 10...c5), white must be careful not to take the P/d4 as it is poisoned.

9...Be7 10 Nf3 NxN+ 11 BxN 0-0 12 Qc2 Bf6 13 Rd1 Qe7 14 a3 a5 15 Bd2 a4 16 Bb4 c5

     My strategy was to induce this move, as it gives me a great square on d5 for my bishop, and it leaves black's P/b7 permanently weak.

17 Bd2 Re8 18 Rac1 g6 19 b3 (Meeting the threat of ...Bf5, trapping the queen on c2) Bf5 20 Qa2 Be4 21 ba Rxa4 22 Bh6 Rea8 23 BxB QxB 24 Qc2 QxQ 25 RxQ Rxa3 26 Rb1 Ra1 27 R2c1

     Seeing that my original plan of 27 R2b2 doesn't work, I reverted to plan B.

R1a2 28 Kf1 Re8 29 Re1 Rc2 30 Rxb2 Rxc4 31 R1b1 Ra4 32 Rc7!

     Threatening to double rooks on the 7th.

32...Rb4

      32...Ra2 might be objectively better, but black was already getting low on time and thus was unable to work through the complications that would ensue.

33 RxR cb 34 Rb7 Be7 35 Bd2! (recovering the pawn, with the better endgame) Bf8 36 Bxb4 Rd8 37 BxB KxB 38 Ke1 d3?

     This gives me an easy win. All I have to do is push 39 e3, and then win the P/d3 in straightforward fashion. If white leaves the pawn on d4, his king can get to e5 to guard it, and I will have to work for the win.

39 de?? Rxd3 1/2-1/2

Unfortunately, I failed to find 39 e3, and now it is a dead draw. We played on a few more moves before agreeing to the draw.
                                               ***                                             ***
Round 3, Witt(1884)-chessart(1835), Sicilian Dragon
1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 Nc3 Nf6 4 d4 cd 5 Nxd4 g6 6 Be3 Bg7 7 f3 0-0 8 Qd2 Nc6 9 Bc4 Bd7 10 0-0-0 Qa5 11 g4 Rfc8 12 Bb3 Ne5 13 Bh6


     13 h4 is by far the most common, followed in a distant second by 13 Kb1. 13 Bh6 is in third, scoring a healthy 65% for black.

13...Nc4?

     Usual here is 13...Bxh6. The main game proceeded  Bxh6 14. Qxh6 Rxc3 15. bxc3 Qxc3 16. Kb1 Nc4 17. Bxc4 Qxc4 18. Qe3 Rc8 19. Rd2 a5 20. Ka1 e5 21. Ne2 Be6 22. c3 Qa4 23. Rb1 Nd7 24. Qd3 Nc5 25. Qc2 Qa3 26. Rb6 Na4 27. Rbxd6 Nc5 28. Rd8+ Kg7 29. Kb1 Rc6 30. R8d6 Rc7 31. Qb2 Qa4 32. g5 Qc4 33. Ka1 b5 34. R2d4 exd4 35. Rxd4 Nb3+ 36. axb3 Qxb3 1/2-1/2

     The general principle here is that black must sac early on c3 whenever white plays an early g4. Note that white must stop for defense on move 18, because otherwise black's attack proceeds unimpeded, while white has no attack as his queen is useless on h6. Note also that black can proceed equally effectively with 16...a5 or 16...Rc8 (instead of 16...Nc4).

14 BxN RxB 15 BxB KxB 16 Nb3 Qd8 17 e5 Nxg4 18 fg Bxg4 19 Re1 de 20 QxQ RxQ 21 Rxe5 e6 22 Rg1 h5 23 Nd1 Bf5 24 Ne3 Rh4??

     24...Rf4 holds, but white still has a healthy advantage of +1.30.

25 RxB! 1-0

Wednesday, December 16, 2015

PCC October Quads

Gaikwad((1933)-chessart(1832), 10/17/15, Symmetical English
1 Nf3 c5 2 c4 Nf6 3 Nc3 d5 4 cd Nxd5 5 g3 Nc6 6 Bg2 Nc7

Results from a database indicate that black already has an advantage from this position.

7 0-0 e5 8 d3 Be7

Black's advantage is now a healthy 14%.

9 Nd2

I must confess that this move, while quite popular, mystifies me. Why white wants to waste two tempos to reposition his knight to c4 is a mystery to me.

Bd7 10 Nc4 f6 11 f4 b5!

 This strong move forces white's knight on c4 to move, at a time when the knight has no good squares to go to. He is therefore forced to block the diagonal for his queen bishop.

12 Ne3 0-0?

Usual is 12...exf4. The main line then proceeds 13 gxf4 Rb8 14 Ned5 NxN 15 NxN 0-0 16 Be3 Nd4 17 Rc1 Be6=

13 Ncd5 NxN 14 NxN Bd6 15Be3 Nd4 16 Rc1 Bg4 17 Rf2 Rc8 18 h3 Be6 19 Kh2 Nf5 20 Bd2 Kh8 21 Nc3 b4 22 Ne4 Bxa2?

This is a case of the threat being stronger than the execution. Black should play 22...a5, and now white has to worry about his pawn on a2.

23 fe fe 24 Ra1 Bg8 25 Rxa7 Bb8 26 Ra6

Black had a healthy half-pawn advantage a few moves ago, but now white is ahead by .70.

26...Bd5 27 Rc1 Ba7 28 Qf1 BxN 29 BxB Nd4 30 Be3 RxR+ 31 QxR Qf6 32 BxN ed 33 QxQ PxQ 34 Rf1 Rf8 35 Qf5 Kg7 36 Rh5 h6 37 Rd5 Rf7 38 h4 Bb6 39 Rd6 Ba7 40 h5 Re7 41 Kg2 Rc7 42 b3 Re7 1-0

And here my time slipped below five minutes and I stopped keeping score. While material is even, white has a positionally won game, as his king can penetrate my position on the light-colored squares, while my king is stuck where he is. Beyond that, white's rook and bishop are actively placed, while their black counterparts are relegated to passive, defensive roles.

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

My first good result in a PCC Swiss tournament. I beat two lower-rated players and drew with two higher-rated players. (I was lucky not to have to play the Master or the Expert.) Here are the two draws. In each of these games I blundered in the opening, but recovered to achieve the draw.

Surak-chessart, Round 3, Veresof Opening, A45

1 d4 Nf6 2 Nc3


The Veresof Opening, which already hands the advantage to black.

2...c5

Gives black a healthy 5.6% advantage. 2...d5 and 2...c6 also retain black's advantage in the unenterprising opening white has played.


3 dc

Black's advantage is now at 5.7%.

3...Qa5

3...e6 is played slightly more often. My advantage is now at 7.2%. I have always been loathe to develop my queen so soon, but in recent weeks I have been studying openings in which one player does this. Oddly, I prematurely developed my queen in both this game and the next one, an experiment which I am not likely to repeat!

4 Nf3 Qxc5 5 e4 d6 6 Be2 g6

Only game in the 365chess database continued 7. O-O Bg7 8. Be3 Qa5 9. Nd4 O-O 10. Nb3 Qc7 11. f4 Nc6 12. Kh1 Be6 13. Qe1 Na5 14. Nxa5 Qxa5 15. Bd3 Rfc8 16. f5 Bc4 17. Qh4 Bxd3 18. cxd3 Qb4 19. Rab1 d5 20. a3 Qa5 21. e5 Nd7 22. d4 Re8 23. Bh6 Bh8 24. fxg6 hxg6 25. Qf4 f5 26. Qg5 1-0

7 Be3 Qc7 8 0-0 Bg7 9  Bd4 0-0 Bg7 9 Bd4

Here I should have asked myself, "Why did he make that move?" Had I asked myself this basic question, I would have readily seen his follow up.

0-0 10 BxN BxB

10...ef loses the d-pawn immediately to 11 Nb5.

11 Nd5 Qd8 12 NxB+ ef 13 Qd2 Qe7 14 Rfe1 Nc6

Snatching the e-pwn just looked too dangerous. The computer agrees.

15 Rad1 Rd8 16 Bb5 Bg4 17 BxN bc 18 Re3 BxN 19 RxB d5 20 Rd3 Qxe4

This "win" of a pawn is only temporary.

21 Rd4 Qe7 22 c4 Re8

The computer thinks 22...Rd6 gives me an advantage.

23 cd cd 24 Rxd5 Qe2 25 QxQ RxQ 26 R5d2 R8d8

A double rook ending is now in full swing.

27 Kf1 R2e7 28 Rd8 RxR 29 RxR+ Kg7 30 Rd2 f5 31 Re2 Rc7 32 Ke1 Kf6 33 Kd1 g5 34 b3 h5 35 Rc2 Rd7+ 36 Kc1 Ke5 37 Re2+ Kf4 38 Rd2 Rc7+ 39 Rc2 Rd7 40 b4 Ke4 41 a4 Rb7?

I could have equalized completely with 41...Rd4!

42 Rb2 Ke3 43 b5 Kc3? (43...Kc4!=)

44 a5 Kc4 45 b6 Kc5 46 Rc2+ Kb5 47 Rc7 Ka6 48 Rc5 drawn by agreement

White was quite low on time and offered the draw. After the game the top players pointed out that white has an easy win by trading rooks and then going after black's king-side pawns with his king.

                                                              ***
Witt-chessart, rd.2, Catalan

1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 g3 d5 4 Bg2 dc 5 Qa4+?

5 Nf3 is much better. A sample game runs 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g3 d5 4. Bg2 dxc4 5. Nf3 Nc6 6. Qa4 Bb4+ 7. Bd2 Nd5 8. Bxb4 Nxb4 9. O-O Rb8 10. Nc3 a6 11. Ne5 O-O 12. Nxc6 Nxc6 13. Bxc6 bxc6 14. Qxc4 Qd6 15. Ne4 Qd5 16. Qxd5 exd5 17. Nc5 Rxb2 18. e3 Bf5 19. f3 a5 20. g4 Bg6 21. Rf2 Rfb8 22. Raf1 f6 23. Kg2 Kf7 24. Kg3 Ke7 25. Rxb2 Rxb2 26. Rf2 Rb1 27. Rg2 h5 28. h3 Bf7 29. h4 hxg4 30. Kxg4 g6 31. a4 Re1 32. Kf4 Rh1 33. Kg3 Re1 34. Kf4 Rh1 35. Kg3 Re1 36. Kf2 Rh1 37. Rg1 Rxh4 38. Rb1 Rh2+ 39. Kg3 Re2 40. Rb7 Kd6 41. Rb3 g5 42. Nb7+ Kd7 43. Nxa5 c5 44. dxc5 d4 45. Rd3 Rxe3 46. Rxd4+ Kc8 47. Nc6 Be8 48. Kf2 Re6 49. Rd8+ Kb7 50. Nd4 Re5 51. a5 Ka6 52. Ra8+ Kb7 53. Rd8 Ka6 54. Ra8+ Kb7 55. Rd8 Ka6 1/2-1/2

Another game runs (from 22nd move)  22. Re1 f6 23. Kg2 h5 24. gxh5 Bxh5 25. Nd3 Rxf2+ 26. Kxf2 a4 27. e4 dxe4 28. fxe4 a3 29. Ke3 Bf7 30. Re2 Rb1 31. Rc2 Ra1 32. Nc1 f5 33. exf5 Bd5 34. Rc3 Rb1 35. Nd3 Rb2 36. Rxa3 Rxh2 37. Ra8+ Kh7 38. Nf4 Rxa2 39. Rxa2 Bxa2 40. Ke4 Kh6 41. Ke5 Kg5 42. Nh3+ Kg4 43. Nf2+ Kf3 44. Ne4 Kg4 1/2-1/2

5...Nbd7 6 Qxc4 Nb6

I can't find any games with this move, but it seems to be good for black.

7 Qc2?

7 Qd3 seems better, though it still looks awkward.

Qxd4 8 Qxc7 Nfd5 9 Qc2 Nb4 10 Qe4

Had black played the other knight to d5 on move 8, I would not have this defense.

10...QxQ 11 BxQ f5 12 a3 PxB 13 PxN Bxb4+ 14 Bd2 BxB+

The computer thinks 14...Bc5 gives black a 1.95 edge.

15 NxB e3

Black could not save his pawn, so he gives it to me under advantageous conditions.

16 fe Nd5 17 Kf6 Nf6 18 h3 Bd7 19 Ngf3 Ke7 20 Rhc1 Rhc8 21 Ne5 RxR 22 RxR Kd6 23 Ndf3 a6 24 NxB KxB 25 Ne5+ Kd6 26 Nf7+ Kd7 27 Ne5+ drawn

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Some French Games with 4 Ne2



C15 main line.   1 e4 e6 2 d4 d5 3 Nc3 Bb4 4 Ne2 de 5 a3 BxN (5…Be7 is slightly preferred to this move) 6 NxB Nc6 (almost universally preferred to the alternatives) 7 Bb5 Ne7 8 Bg5 f6 9 Be3 0-0 10 Qd2 f5 11 0-0-0 a6 (11…Nd5 has much greater success, but 11…a6 is slightly preferred by Black players) 12 BxN NxB 13 f3 ef 14 gf e5 15 d5 Ne7 and now there are several moves for white, but overall black, who still has his extra pawn, scores well.

chessart-harvos, 10-25-14   1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Ne2 c5 (only one data-base game with this move !) 5. a3 (the  move the computers recommend) Bxc3+ 6. Nxc3 Nc6 (computers do not mention this move) 7. Bb5 (comp. gives 7 dc with a healthy 1.59 plus for white) cxd4 8. Qxd4 Qf6 9. Qxf6 Nxf6 10. exd5 Nxd5 11. Nxd5 exd5 12. Bf4 O-O 13. O-O a6 14. Bxc6 bxc6 15. Rfe1 Bf5 16. c3 Rfe8 17. Rad1 Re6 18. Kf1 Rae8 19. Rxe6 Rxe6 20. Re1??

A horrible blunder. 20 f3 is roughly equal, though I have the better chances due to my better pawn structure. But look at 20 c4! He can't take the pawn due to the back rank mate, and neither can he effectively guard it. So, it looks like I can win the pawn and, time permitting, I should be able to grind him down.

 Bd3+ {White resigns} 0-1

chessart-Juntsu, 9-24-14   1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Ne2 dxe4 5. a3 Be7 6. Nxe4 Nf6 7. N2g3 ( 7 Qd3 is played equally often) O-O 8. c3 Bd7 (8...Nbd7 is usual; 8…Bd7 is not played at all) 9. Bd3 Bc6 10. Qe2 Nbd7 11. Bg5 h6 12. Bxf6 Nxf6 13. O-O b6 14. Rfe1 Bb7 15. Rad1 c6 16. Nxf6+ Bxf6 17. Qe4 g6 18. Nh5 Qe7 19. Re3 c5 20. Qg4 Bg7 21. Rg3 g5 22. h4 f5 23. Qe2 Qf7 24. hxg5 hxg5 25. Rxg5 Kh7 26. Rxg7+ Kh8 27. Rxf7 Rxf7 28. Nf4 Bd5 29. Qh5+ Kg8 30. Re1 Rg7 31. Nxd5 exd5 32. Bxf5 Rf8 33. Be6+ {Black resigns} 1-0

chessart-daskapitallesen, 9-24-14   1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Ne2 dxe4 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. Nxc3 f5 7. f3 exf3 8. Qxf3 Qxd4 (8…Nf6 is the only move played here. Taking the second pawn is considered too risky) 9. Be3 Qd7 (9…Qg4 is usual, but this move is an alternative) 10. Bd3 (computer gives 10 Bc4) Nf6 11. O-O-O Qc6?? 12. Bb5 {Black resigns} 1-0

chessart-coleman, 9-23-14   1. d4 e6 2. e4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Ne2 dxe4 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. Nxc3 Nf6 7. Bg5 h6 8. Bxf6 Qxf6 9. Nxe4 Qg6 (9...Qe7 is usually played, though the computer gives this move as about equal to Qe7) 10. Qf3 (10 Ng3 is the given move, so we leave the book) Nc6 11. c3 e5 12. d5 Bg4 13. Qd3 Ne7 14. Ng3 Qxd3 15. Bxd3 Nxd5 16. Be4 c6 17. f3 Be6 18. O-O-O O-O-O 19. Rd2 Ne3 20. Re2 Nc4 21. Rhe1 g6 22. Bc2 f5 23. Bb3 Bd5 24. Bxc4 Bxc4 25. Rxe5 Bb3 26. Re7 Rhf8 27. Ne2 g5 28. Nd4 Bd5 29. Ne6 Bxe6 30. R1xe6 h5 31. h3 g4 32. fxg4 fxg4 33. hxg4 hxg4 34. Rg6 Rf1+ 35. Kc2 Rf2+ 36. Kb3 Rd7 37. Rxd7 Kxd7 38. Rxg4 Ke6 39. Rg7 b5 40. g4 a5 41. g5 c5 42. Rg8 Kd5 43. g6 a4+ 44. Ka2 Rg2 45. g7 Kc4 46. Rh8 Rxg7 47. Rh4+ Kd3 48. Rh3+ Kc2 49. Rh5 Rc7 50. Rh2+ Kc1 51. Rh8 b4 52. cxb4 cxb4 53. axb4 Rc4 54. Rb8 Kc2 55. Ka3 Re4 56. b5 Re3+ 57. Kxa4 Kxb2 58. Ka5 Ra3+ 59. Kb6 Rb3 60. Kc7 Kc3 61. b6 Rb5 62. b7 Kb4 63. Rh8 Rc5+ 64. Kd6 {Black forfeits on time} 1-0

chessart-Battler, 10-19-14    1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Ne2 c5 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. Nxc3 Nf6 7. dxc5 Nxe4 (already out of the database's book) 8. Nxe4 dxe4 9. Qxd8+ Kxd8 10. Bf4 Nc6 11. O-O-O+ Ke8 12. Bc4 Bd7 13. Rhe1 f5 14. Rd2 e5 15. Red1 Rd8 16. Bg5 Ne7 17. Bb5 h6 18. Bxe7 Kxe7 19. Rxd7+ Rxd7 20. Rxd7+ Ke6 21. Rxb7 g5 22. Rxa7 Rc8 23. Bc4+ Kf6 24. Rf7+ Kg6 25. Re7 Rxc5 26. b3 f4 27. Kd2 g4 28. Ke2 h5 29. Re6+ Kg5 30. Re8 f3+ 31. gxf3 exf3+ 32. Ke3 Kh4 33. Rh8 e4 34. Re8 Kh3 35. Rxe4 Kxh2 36. a4 Kg2 37. Re8 Rg5 38. Rh8 g3 39. fxg3 Rg4 40. Rxh5 Rxg3 41. Rf5 f2+ 42. Ke2 Rc3 43. Rxf2+ Kg3 44. Kd2 Rxc2+ 45. Kxc2 Kxf2 46. a5 Ke3 47. a6 Kd4 48. a7 Ke5 49. a8=Q Kf4 50. Qd5 Ke3 51. Kc3 Kf2 52. Qe5 Kg2 53. Kd3 Kf2 54. Qf5+ {Black forfeits on time}1-0

chessart-JavaMeister, 9-23-14    1. d4 e6 2. e4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Ne2 dxe4 5. a3 Be7 6. Nxe4 Nf6 7. N2g3 Nc6 8. c3 Bd7 9. Bd3 O-O 10. O-O Re8 11. Qf3 Rb8 12. Bg5 Nxe4 13. Bxe7 Nd2 14. Qh5 g6 15. Bxd8 gxh5 16. Bxc7 Rbc8 17. Rfd1 Nb3 18. Nxh5 Rxc7 19. Nf6+ Kg7 20. Nxe8+ Bxe8 21. Rab1 Nca5 22. Bc2 b5 23. Rd3 f6 24. Re1 Re7 25. d5 e5 26. d6 Rd7 27. Rg3+ Kh8 28. Rh3 Kg8 29. f4 Bg6 30. Bxg6 hxg6 31. fxe5 fxe5 32. Rxe5 Rxd6 33. Re7 Nc6 34. Rc7 Nc5 35. Rhh7 Ne6 36. Rb7 a6 37. h3 Nc5 38. Rbc7 Ne4 39. Rcg7+ Kf8 40. Rd7 Rxd7 41. Rxd7 Ne5 42. Ra7 Nc4 43. Rxa6 Kf7 44. Kf1 Nxb2 45. Rb6 Nxc3 46. Ke1 Nc4 47. Ra6 Na4 48. Ke2 Nxa3 49. Kd2 Nc4+ 50. Kc1 Kg7 51. Kb1 Kh6 52. Ra8 Kg5 53. Kc2 Ne3+ 54. Kb3 Nd5 55. Rb8 Nc5+ 56. Kb2 Nc7 57. Rc8 N5e6 58. Kb3 Kh4 59. Kb4 Kg3 60. Rg8 g5 61. Rg6 Kh4 62. Rg8 Kg3 63. Rg6 Kf4 64. Rg8 Kf5 65. g3 Kf6 66. h4 Kf5 67. hxg5 Kg4 68. g6 Kg5 69. g7 Kg6 70. Rc8 Kxg7 71. Kc3 Kf6 72. Kb4 Kf5 73. Rb8 Kg4 74. Rxb5 Nxb5 75. Kxb5 Kxg3 {Game drawn because neither player has mating material} 1/2-1/2

chessart-Orpheus, 10-17-14   1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Ne2 dxe4 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. Nxc3 f5 7. f3 Nf6 8. fxe4 fxe4 9. Bg5 O-O 10. Bxf6 Qxf6 11. Nxe4 Qf5 12. Bd3 Qf4 13. Rf1 Qxh2 14. Rxf8+ Kxf8 15. Qf3+ Kg8 16. O-O-O Qh6+ 17. Kb1 Nc6 18. Rf1 {Black disconnected and forfeits} 1-0


chessart-fabioff, 10-22-14   1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Ne2 dxe4 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. Nxc3 f5 7. f3 exf3 8. Qxf3 Ne7 9. Bc4 O-O 10. O-O c6 11. Bg5 h6 12. Bh4 g5 13. Bf2 b5 14. Ba2 Nd5 15. Rae1 Nxc3 16. Qxc3 Qf6 17. Re5 Re8 18. Rfe1 Kf7 19. Qd3 Na6 20. Rxf5 Qxf5 21. Qxf5+ Kg7 22. Qe5+ Kg6 23. c3 Nc7 24. Bb1+ Kf7 25. Re3 Nd5 26. Rf3+ Ke7 27. Qg7+ Kd8 28. Bg6 Re7 29. Rf8+ Kd7 30. Qxh6 Bb7 31. Rxa8 Bxa8 32. Qxg5 Bb7 33. Bh4 a5 34. Qe5 c5 35. Bxe7 Nxe7 36. Bh5 cxd4 37. Qxb5+ Bc6 38. Qd3 Nd5 39. Qxd4 Kc7 40. Bg4 Kd6 41. Qh8 Nf4 42. Qd8+ Ke5 43. Qc7+ Kd5 44.
Bf3+ Kc5 45. Qxc6# {Black checkmated} 1-0

chessart-colombier, 10-23-14   1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Ne2 Nf6 5. Bg5 h6 (5...de is preferred here by 3-1) 6. Bxf6 Qxf6 7. e5? (This hands black the advantage; 7 a3 is equal) Qe7 8. a3 Ba5 9. b4 Bb6 10. Na4 Nc6 11. Nc5 O-O 12. Ng3 a5 13. c3 axb4 14. axb4 Rxa1 15. Qxa1 Bxc5 16. bxc5 Bd7 17. Bd3 b6 18. cxb6 cxb6 19. Qb2 Rb8 20. O-O Na5 21. Rb1 Nc4 22. Bxc4 dxc4 23. Qb4 Qxb4 24. Rxb4 b5 25. Ne4 Kf8 26. Nd6 Ke7 27. f4 Bc6 28. Kf2 Ra8 29. Rb2 Ra5 30. g3 g5 31. fxg5 hxg5 32. h4 gxh4 33. gxh4 f6 34. Ke3 fxe5 35. dxe5 Kf8 36. Kd4 Kg7 37. Kc5 Be8 38. Nxe8+ {Black resigns} 1-0

chessart-Knallbonbob, 1-11-15   1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Ne2 dxe4 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. Nxc3 Nf6 7. Bg5 c5? (This hands white a huge advantage) 8. Bxf6? (8 dc and I have that huge advantage) Qxf6 9. dxc5 Qe5 10. Bb5+ Bd7 11. O-O a6 12. Be2 O-O 13. Re1 f5 14. Qd6 Qxd6 15. cxd6 Bc6 16. f3 exf3 17. Bxf3 Bxf3 18. gxf3 Kf7 19. Rad1 Nd7 20. f4 Rac8 21. Rd2 Rc4 22. Ne2 Rfc8 23. c3 Re4 24. Kf2 Rd8 25. Kf3 Nc5 26. Red1 Rd7 27. Ng3 Ra4 28. Rd4 Rxd4 29. Rxd4 g6 30. h4 Kf6 31. Rd2 e5 32. fxe5+ Kxe5 33. b4 Na4 34. c4 Rxd6 35. Re2+ Kf6 36. c5 Rd3+ 37. Re3 Rxe3+ 38. Kxe3 Ke5 39. Ne2 h6 40. Nd4 g5 41. Nf3+ Kf6 42. hxg5+ hxg5 43. Nd2 Nc3 44. Kf3 Nd5 45. Nc4 g4+ 46. Kg3 Kg5 47. Nd6 f4+ {White forfeits on time} 0-1